Europe: The Case of the Vanishing Women

Women have literally disappeared from cafés and bars in certain predominantly Muslim suburbs in France, according to recently aired undercover footage from the France 2 television channel. The footage featured two women activists, Nadia Remadna and Aziza Sayah, from the women’s rights campaign group, La Brigade des Mères (Brigade of Mothers), entering a café in the Paris suburb of Sevran, where they were met with surprise and hostility from the all-male customers. One told them: “It is best to wait outside. There are men in here… In this café, there is no diversity.”

Another customer told them: “In this café, there is no mixing. We are in Sevran, not Paris. Here there is a different mentality. It is like back home.”

In a suburb of Lyon, France 2 TV journalist Caroline Sinz spoke to a young woman who said that she is quite simply afraid to go out, and wears baggy clothes and no makeup to avoid being targeted by the Muslim men in the neighborhood.

In the words of Sinz, women seem “to have been erased,” from the cafés and the streets. Sinz goes on to explain that women in these areas used to protest against the status quo, but now,

“They are afraid, they have already spoken out in many cities, and were insulted and assaulted… So now to avoid threats, and being put under pressure, they censor themselves and keep quiet.”

Axelle Lemaire, France’s Minister for Digital Affairs, and the first government official to comment on the footage, said the footage appeared to show an “intolerable” and “illegal” case of “discrimination against women”. However, she was quick to add that it was not a question of religion, and said that France’s Muslim communities should not be blamed.

Lemaire’s comment about religion reveals, once more, the willful ignorance that so many in Europe’s political establishment display in their refusal to deal with the issues of Islamization. Sevran is part of the district of Seine-Saint-Denis, an area inhabited by over 600,000 Muslims, out of 1.4 million people. Already in 2011, a report by the highly respected political scientist and expert on Islam, Gilles Kepel, “Banlieue de la République” (“Suburb of the Republic”), showed that Seine-Saint-Denis, as well as other suburbs, were becoming parallel Islamic societies, increasingly cut off from the rest of French society. That women have now disappeared from the streets of Sevran cannot be divorced from the fact of the Islamization of these societies.

This Islamization has been fueled and strengthened by Qatar’s heavy investments — particularly in mosques — in France during the past five years. These investments currently stand at around $22 billion. Investments in mosques are how Qatar is apparently spreading Wahhabism/Salafism — a particularly radical form of Islam — around the world.

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What Will Replace ISIS?

Before long the same administration that declared the fighting in Iraq over several times will claim victory over ISIS. The timetable for its push against the Islamic State appears to have less do with the victimized Christians and Yazidis who have been prevented from coming here as refugees in favor of Syrian Muslims than with the Clinton presidential campaign. Like Obama’s declarations that the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq were over, the announcement that ISIS has been defeated will be premature.

It is based on a profound misunderstanding and misreading of Islamic terrorism.

Long before its current string of defeats, ISIS had begun evolving into another Al Qaeda; a multinational alliance of Jihadists scattered around the world. Bombing Mosul isn’t hard, but try bombing Marseille, Brussels or London. There is no doubt that the ability of ISIS to temporarily establish a caliphate allowed it to build a network that could carry out terror attacks from New York to Miami to Nice to Munich. But it would be dangerous to assume that losing Iraq and Syria will stop ISIS.

ISIS doesn’t matter. The idea of ISIS does. And the idea of ISIS is Islamic supremacism.

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