Why Won’t the British Left Pick on Someone Else?

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The 2018 annual conference of Britain’s Labour Party proved that, however strong the criticism, and however embarrassing the scandal, there are many in England who will get on with their top priority: slandering and libelling one of the world’s most outstanding countries, Israel. At the same time, they seem never to tire of singing the praises of the Palestinians, regardless of the savagery with which they govern their own people.

They also seem comfortable overlooking the Palestinians’ repeated rejections of peace, and their glorifying and funding non-stop terrorism.

The oddity of this approach generally escapes the mainstream media or is amplified by them, and is proliferated across all sorts of social media such as Twitter, and anti-Zionist blogs, websites, and YouTube channels, where it often merges with Holocaust denial, on sites such as Facebook, neo-Nazi rants, Muslim anti-Zionist pages, and speeches by Muslim preachers who choose to live on the dark side of their faith.

The question, of course, is “Why Israel?” Are there not enough dictatorships and oppressive regimes in the world to keep any decent socialist busy on a hundred other fronts?

Not long after that Labour Party conference, your humble correspondent attended a smaller event in Newcastle upon Tyne on October 3, 2018, where a local Labour MP, Catherine McKinnell, addressed a packed hall to apologize for the blatant anti-Semitism in her party. It has to be said that McKinnell herself had nothing to apologize for. She is not Jewish, but she was among the hundreds of people protesting anti-Semitism in the Labour Party outside the Houses of Parliament on March 26 earlier this year. The protest brought home to many observers the simple truth that Jews were profoundly worried, if not afraid, to see a resurgence of anti-Jewish activity in the political party for which they had mainly voted all their lives.

via Why Won’t the British Left Pick on Someone Else?

“It’s time to stop discussing racism and Islamophobia and time to start discussing the rape of Britain’s children”

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On the 17th December 2018, hosted by Lord Pearson in the House of Lords, the #1400 Campaign was launched to help the survivors of the rape gangs blighting Great Britain. A number of speeches and harrowing testimonies were given, and here is a transcript of the speech delivered by AltNewsMedia’s Shazia Hobbs. #The1400Campaign HOUSE OF LORDS LAUNCH SPEECH: SHAZIA HOBBS

It has been four years since the Alexis Jay Report was released. David Cameron who was Prime Minister at that time said that what the report revealed regarding child sexual exploitation “was a national threat akin to terrorism and a major civil disorder.” He also stated that anyone with responsibility for children who ignores the problem could face 5 years in jail. He described this as being on an industrial scale and promised a plethora of solutions.

I read the Jay Report last year and I cried. I cried knowing that what was happening all those years ago in Rotherham was still happening today not just in Rotherham but in Rochdale, Oxford, Newcastle, Telford – the list of towns and cities keeps on growing, the number of victims keeps on increasing yet the help that was promised for this national threat is nowhere to be seen.

I wanted to make sure this country feels the full impact of what it has covered up and what it is still covering up. And that is the rape and trafficking of children by Muslim rape gangs.

I want to shame the successive governments from both right and left who covered up the industrialised rape of our children. I want to shame every single person whose job it was to protect our children. And who failed.

via “It’s time to stop discussing racism and Islamophobia and time to start discussing the rape of Britain’s children”

The Guardian, Tommy Robinson, and Me

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Damn it, the Guardian is on to us. On Friday, Britain’s most important, or rather self-important, newspaper ran a piece headlined “Revealed: the hidden global network behind Tommy Robinson.”

Move over, Pentagon Papers.

Clearly, this is Pulitzer Prize-level journalism – although, unfortunately, Brits are ineligible for that particular distinction. Obviously, the Guardian reporters in question – Josh Halliday, Lois Beckett, and Caelainn Barr – have stumbled upon that obscure and highly sophisticated research tool known as Google. And through Google, they’ve uncovered the sensational, previously unnoticed fact that two “US thinktanks…have published a succession of articles in support of Robinson,” while a third U.S. think tank has – gasp! – helped pay for Tommy’s legal fees.

These three think tanks, the Guardian scribes assert, “have been repeatedly accused of stoking anti-Islam sentiment in the west and spreading false information about Muslim refugees in Europe.” (Among the institutions that have been in the forefront of making these baseless accusations, unsurprisingly, is the Guardian itself.) The Guardian writers further contend that Tommy’s support from these “prominent and well-financed groups undermines Robinson’s self-styled image of a far-right populist underdog whose anti-Islam agenda is being silenced by the British establishment.”

Hold on a second and take a look at that last sentence. Has Tommy really sought to style an image for himself as a “far-right” activist? Who on earth would do that? Or has he constantly denied, quite correctly, that there’s anything “far-right” about him? This is journalism at its shabbiest. As for his being “silenced by the British establishment” – no, he hasn’t exactly been silenced. This Guardian article itself is a perfect illustration of the fact that he has, rather, been smeared, maligned, defamed, vilified, calumniated, misquoted, misinterpreted, and misrepresented by that establishment. Consistently.

They never miss an opportunity to mention that his real name is Stephen Yaxley-Lennon. Yes, and Cary Grant’s real name was Archibald Leach. Jack Benny was Benjamin Kubelsky. Tony Curtis was Bernard Schwartz. So what? They mention that he (Tommy, not Cary Grant or Jack Benny or Tony Curtis) was a member of the racist English Defence League – but they never add that he quit the EDL as soon as he found out it was racist.

via The Guardian, Tommy Robinson, and Me | Frontpage Mag

An Invitation to a Discussion to Marc Lamont Hill

Beyond the Cusp

#Marc Lamont Hill, you flew half-way around the world to stand in lands which even the United Nations recognizes as an integral part of Israel to make accusations about things which it is obvious that you have absolutely no knowledge. Do not feel poorly about this because many of the world’s leaders are equally ignorant. Now we know you are an educated man but please realize that ignorance is not an insult to your mental capacities, it is simply the state of not knowing the actual facts about a subject, something which you obviously lack when it comes to Israel. We would like to first address some of the most glaring inconsistencies between your statements and the actual facts. Number one is the Arab citizens of Israel have every single right that a Jewish citizen of Israel possesses. These exactly same rights go for Christians, Baha’I, Hindu, Muslim, Buddhist, Animist…

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The EU’s Dangerous New Confidence Game

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At the start of this decade, a minor story occurred that set the scene for the years that have followed. In 2010, a Saudi lawyer named Faisal Yamani wrote to the Danish newspapers that had published cartoons of Islam’s prophet, Mohammed. Claiming to act on behalf of 95,000 descendants of Mohammed, the Saudi lawyer said that the cartoons were defamatory and that legal proceedings would thereby begin.

However, everything about the supposed legal claim reeked. How had Mr Yamani located all these descendants? How had he come up with exactly 95,000 of them? And how could you claim that a statement about somebody who died 1,400 years ago was “defamatory”? Legally, one cannot “defame” the dead.

Everything about the claim was laughable Yet it had its desired effect. At least one Danish paper — Politiken — swiftly issued an apology for republishing the cartoons. So Mr Yamani got what he wanted. He had (one might suggest) conjured up a set of alleged victims and cobbled together an alleged offence, but no matter, because he also got a European newspaper to fold in no seconds flat. It was an interesting probe of the European system of justice — and a good example of submission. And a fine scene-setting precedent for the decade that has followed.

Now, eight years later, an even greater act of submission has come along. This one not imposed from some dodgy Saudi lawyer, but from the highest court in Europe.

At the end of last month, the European Court of Human Rights issued its ruling in a long-running case involving an Austrian woman named Elisabeth Sabaditsch-Wolff. Way back in 2009, in Vienna, Sabaditsch-Wolff (who has lived in several Muslim countries) gave two seminars entitled, “Basic Information on Islam.” During these talks, in the words of the ECHR:

via The EU’s Dangerous New Confidence Game