Speak Up Dear!

An elderly man feared his wife was getting hard of hearing. So he called her doctor to make an appointment to have her hearing checked. 
 
The doctor said he could see her in two weeks, but meanwhile, suggested a simple, informal test the husband could do to give the doctor some idea of the dimensions of the problem. 
 
“Here’s what you do. Start about 40 feet away from her, and speak in a normal conversational tone and see if she hears you. If not, go to 30 feet, then 20 feet, and so on until you get a response.” 
So that evening she’s in the kitchen cooking dinner, and he’s in the living room, and he says to himself, “I’m about 40 feet away, let’s see what happens when I talk to her.” 
 
“Honey, what’s for dinner?” He calls.
No response. 
 
So he moves to the other end of the room, about 30 feet away.
“Honey, what’s for dinner?”
No response
 

scream joke

So he moves into the dining room, about 20 feet away. He starts shouting.
“HONEY, what’s for dinner?”
No response.
 
On to the kitchen door, only 10 feet away.
“HONEY, what’s for DINNER??”.
No response
 
So he walks right up behind her and screams:
“HONEY, WHAT’S FOR DINNER??!?!”
 
His wife turns to him a rage and screams.
CHICKEN, CHICKEN! For the FIFTH TIME, WE’RE HAVING CHICKEN!!!

Hallelujah!

According to The Jerusalem Post:

Bahrain’s King Hamad bin Isa al Khalifa has denounced the Arab boycott of Israel and said his subjects are free to visit the Jewish state. The statement by the head of the Persian Gulf country, which does not have diplomatic relations with Israel, was revealed at a multi-national event last week in Los Angeles, hosted by the city’s Simon Wiesenthal Center.

At the event, Rabbis Marvin Hier and Abraham Cooper, who head the Wiesenthal Center, revealed the king’s pronouncements made to them during their visit to Manama, Bahrain’s capital city, in early 2017.

A walk through the city, at that time was an eye-opener, Cooper said. There was a church, with a huge cross, next to a Hindu temple, and 90 meters on an impressive mosque. Even a small synagogue, the only one in the Persian Gulf region, still stands in an older part of the city.