BBC’s Bateman recycles the ‘cultural censorship’ theme

BBC Watch

There is nothing remotely novel about the BBC telling its audiences dark (but inaccurate) tales of supposed cultural censorship in Israel.

On December 4th the BBC’s Jerusalem correspondent Tom Bateman returned to that theme with a report (another version of which was also promoted by Bateman on Twitter) aired on the BBC Radio 4 programme ‘The World Tonight’ which was introduced by presenter Ritula Shah (from 36:37 here) as follows: [emphasis in italics in the original]

Shah: “Israel’s culture minister Miri Regev is taking on the Israeli arts world, accusing some of pursuing anti-Israel narratives in state funded works or even of glorifying terrorism. So what happens when the state takes on the often subversive world of art? The story recently reached its [unintelligible] over the fate of the government bill that would see such productions defunded. Our Middle East correspondent Tom Bateman reports.”

Failing to…

View original post 1,086 more words

The World Hardly Changes

Beyond the Cusp

There are a number of things about the world which never change no matter how much humankind believes it has become civilized, it really has not. Back in what we like to call ancient history, people lived in what were called city-states which warred with one another. This was the initial step where it was proclaimed that civilization was upon us as we had grown from the simple clans into organized cities with agriculture and herding and the claim that we had conquered nature. They had not conquered nature as these city-states spent much of their time beating on the city-state right next door. When one city-state conquered the neighboring city-state, they took their grain, cattle and women, enslaving the men. The women were awarded to their greatest fighters to do with as they pleased which often meant they were used and then discarded or killed. The young were ripped…

View original post 2,545 more words

Islamic Republic Judiciary top dog: French protests are “Islamic awakening”

Quote

“Iran Official Says French Protests Are ‘Islamic Awakening,’” Radio Farda, December 10, 2018 (thanks to The Religion of Peace):

The head of the Islamic Republic Judiciary has said on Monday that protests in France are part of the “Islamic awakening” and a development foreseen by Iran’s Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei.

According to Mizan news agency, Ayatollah Sadegh Amoli Larijani said Khamenei had predicted years ago that Islamic awakening will not be limited to Muslim countries and will reach Europe. He did not explain how the protests are related to Muslims.

via Islamic Republic Judiciary top dog: French protests are “Islamic awakening”

Switzerland: “Creeping EU Accession”

Quote

Swiss voters have resoundingly rejected a referendum calling for the Swiss Constitution to take precedence over international treaties and law.

Two-thirds (66.2%) of voters in the November 25 referendum opposed the “self-determination” initiative, put forward by the eurosceptic Swiss People’s Party (Schweizerische Volkspartei, SVP), the largest party in the Swiss parliament.

SVP leaders had argued that the new law was necessary to safeguard national sovereignty from further encroachment by supranational organizations such as the European Union and the United Nations.

The Swiss government countered that the proposal would undermine Switzerland’s economic stability as it would require Bern to amend existing bilateral agreements with the EU, the country’s largest trade partner, to bring them into compliance with the Swiss Constitution.

via Switzerland: “Creeping EU Accession”

The Guardian, Tommy Robinson, and Me

Quote

Damn it, the Guardian is on to us. On Friday, Britain’s most important, or rather self-important, newspaper ran a piece headlined “Revealed: the hidden global network behind Tommy Robinson.”

Move over, Pentagon Papers.

Clearly, this is Pulitzer Prize-level journalism – although, unfortunately, Brits are ineligible for that particular distinction. Obviously, the Guardian reporters in question – Josh Halliday, Lois Beckett, and Caelainn Barr – have stumbled upon that obscure and highly sophisticated research tool known as Google. And through Google, they’ve uncovered the sensational, previously unnoticed fact that two “US thinktanks…have published a succession of articles in support of Robinson,” while a third U.S. think tank has – gasp! – helped pay for Tommy’s legal fees.

These three think tanks, the Guardian scribes assert, “have been repeatedly accused of stoking anti-Islam sentiment in the west and spreading false information about Muslim refugees in Europe.” (Among the institutions that have been in the forefront of making these baseless accusations, unsurprisingly, is the Guardian itself.) The Guardian writers further contend that Tommy’s support from these “prominent and well-financed groups undermines Robinson’s self-styled image of a far-right populist underdog whose anti-Islam agenda is being silenced by the British establishment.”

Hold on a second and take a look at that last sentence. Has Tommy really sought to style an image for himself as a “far-right” activist? Who on earth would do that? Or has he constantly denied, quite correctly, that there’s anything “far-right” about him? This is journalism at its shabbiest. As for his being “silenced by the British establishment” – no, he hasn’t exactly been silenced. This Guardian article itself is a perfect illustration of the fact that he has, rather, been smeared, maligned, defamed, vilified, calumniated, misquoted, misinterpreted, and misrepresented by that establishment. Consistently.

They never miss an opportunity to mention that his real name is Stephen Yaxley-Lennon. Yes, and Cary Grant’s real name was Archibald Leach. Jack Benny was Benjamin Kubelsky. Tony Curtis was Bernard Schwartz. So what? They mention that he (Tommy, not Cary Grant or Jack Benny or Tony Curtis) was a member of the racist English Defence League – but they never add that he quit the EDL as soon as he found out it was racist.

via The Guardian, Tommy Robinson, and Me | Frontpage Mag