Blood Redemption

The first soldier to give his life in service to America was Isaac Davis, a gunsmith shot through the heart at the Battle of Concord on April 19, 1775. The most recent was Kyle Milliken, a Navy senior chief petty officer killed May 5 by Islamist irregulars near Mogadishu, Somalia. Overall, some 1.2 million young Americans have died while under arms, more than one-half of them during the Civil War.

Monday is their day—Memorial Day, when Americans traditionally take a moment to hold in their hearts a thought, a prayer, for those who, as Abraham Lincoln noted, “gave the last full measure of devotion” to the ideals expressed so profoundly in the Declaration of Independence. “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal.” And so it goes—a statement of fundamental purpose, a potential death warrant for those who signed it, and, above all, a unique distillation of centuries of moral evolution, philosophical disputation, and political conflict.

A document worth dying for, in other words.

But original purposes fade over time, obscured by shifting understandings of history and by a failure to grasp that what’s obvious today was not necessarily so clear at the beginning. This seems especially true in America today, where an escalating loss of faith in the animating principles of what Lincoln also termed the “last great hope of earth” is well under way.

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About OyiaBrown

Please send me, as a comment to this page, any old material you have for inclusion in The Daily Joke Alert - to help enable us all to have our fancy tickled regularly! Never mind the state it's in as I tidy everything up prior to publication. Don't let good material go to waste - and so much does. In the interests of the environment we should always try to re-cycle everything, especially jokes. You know that makes sense! You may find some historical stuff here, but this does not really matter as humor is fairly timeless.

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