Turkey and US Relations Sour After Kurdish Militia Attacked

A series of Turkish airstrikes targeting American-allied Kurdish militias in Iraq and Syria threaten to put Turkey and the United States on a “collision course,” experts have warned.

Syrian activists said the attacks, on Sinjar Mountain in northern Iraq and a mountainous region in Syria, killed at least 18 members of the Syrian Kurdish militia known as the People’s Protection Units, or YPG, which are at the center of bitter divisions between the two NATO allies.

The U.S. military is working closely with Kurdish fighters in Syria, considering them as the only viable force capable of seizing the city of Raqqa from the Islamic State. But Turkey regards the militias as a direct offshoot of a Kurdish militant group that poses a grave threat to Turkish security. As a result, a crisis is brewing over the U.S. partnership with the militias.

“The collision course is coming. It’s already come in some respects and it’s a question of how badly this deteriorates,” says Michael Hanna, a senior fellow at the New York-based Century Foundation. “There are U.S. personnel on the ground. In the worst case scenario you’re having Turkey, a NATO ally, a close traditional partner of the United States, could kill American personnel on the ground,” he tells TIME.

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El Lobo Returns Home

In the spring of 2015 I visited Wolf Haven International, a wolf sanctuary in Washington state, to witness the first litters of Mexican gray wolf pups born there in seven years. Via live remote cameras I watched as four gangly six-week-old male pups scampered and climbed atop their very patient father, M1066, nicknamed in house as “Moss.” The big-eared and fuzzy pups romped and feigned attacks with tiny sharp teeth, wrestling with each other, then racing into the tall cedar trees. These critically endangered Mexican gray wolves are growing up in the Species Survival Program (SSP) for possible reintroduction into Arizona, New Mexico, and Mexico. “They’re being raised by their parents, just like any wolf pup in the wild,” explained Wendy Spencer, Wolf Haven’s director of animal care. “Their world is so small now,” she added. “There is no concept of captivity or even humans for the pups. Just their parents, siblings, and home life.”

It’s a good and safe life at Wolf Haven, with its eighty-two acres of restored and biologically diverse prairie and oak woodlands, founded in 1982. These prairie lands are quiet buffers for this, the only wolf sanctuary in the world accredited by the Global Federation of Animal Sanctuaries. Here the carbon-rich grassy meadows offset climate change, a lush red and blue riot of native wildflowers like purple camas and golden paintbrush attract honey bees, and the moss-draped trees offer cool shade and refuge to the fifty-two displaced and captive-born wolves. Some have now found their “forever home” here. Of the several Mexican wolf litters born at the sanctuary, two family groups have already been released into the wild (Arizona): the Hawk’s Nest pack released in 1998 (part of the initial release) and the Cienaga group released in 2000 still survive today. This wolf family is one of the most genetically valuable in all of America’s captive population. By the late seventies wolf populations in the Southwest had crashed to a mere five wolves in Mexico and were all but eliminated in New Mexico and Arizona. Under the Endangered Species Act the federal government must work to recover this critically endangered species.

“All the Mexican wolves living in the wild today come from seven founding animals, composed of three distinct lineages,” Spencer notes. “They really need the genetic boost these new pups can give them,” she pauses thoughtfully, “if any of them are selected for reintroduction into the wild.”

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Hijabbed Muslim journalist complains that when she accepts media award, viewers will see only her hijab

Victimhood status is currency these days. If you’re a victim, all manner of doors open to you that might otherwise have remained closed: doors to the adulation of the Left; doors to free passes from scrutiny (legal or otherwise) that you might otherwise have received; doors to a privileged status that elevates you above ordinary non-victim folk. And few, if any, groups are more skilled and indefatigable at pursuing victim status than Islamic advocacy groups in the U.S. They have successfully established in the public discourse the wholesale fiction that Muslimas who wear hijab are routinely insulted, harassed, and brutalized in the United States. This piece is an extension of that endeavor, sans (as always) the insults, harassment, and brutalization.

Sawsan Morrar, an award-winning hijab-wearing journalist, says: “Those who tune in to watch this year’s White House Correspondents’ Association dinner on Saturday will hear my name called as I take the stage to accept a journalism scholarship. They won’t see my portfolio of work, and they will likely forget my name. But they’re sure to notice and remember one thing about me: my headscarf.”

Maybe so. But isn’t that the idea? Isn’t wearing the hijab a proclamation to the world that here is a Muslim woman who is preserving her modesty and piety, in contrast to the non-Muslim women who are walking around with heads uncovered? If Sawsan Morrar wants to be remembered for something other than the hijab, there is one simple way to ensure that: don’t wear it.

She also says: “And as I prepare to attend, I know some at the event may not perceive me as a fellow reporter who, like them, relishes the thought of meeting journalists I admire. Muslims don’t have the luxury of being a fusion of their achievements, interests and uniqueness. Rather, in the eyes of others, we are only Muslim.”

On what does she base this claim? Nothing whatsoever, of course. But this is the Washington Post during the Trump administration, so anything goes for Muslims wishing to claim victim status.

Morrar concludes: “I do hope that when I am called on stage at the dinner, I will be recognized for my achievements in journalism and not used to portray some striking juxtaposition between the Trump administration and the Muslim community.”

Don’t kid yourself, Ms. Morrar, about your helpful Leftist comrades and allies. They will smile, they will congratulate you, they will praise your achievements, whatever they may be, and however large or small. But your being a Muslim, and a hijabi at that, is the only reason why you’re there. To the White House Correspondents’ Association, your only purpose and value is that you are a Muslim who wears a hijab, and thus constitute for the Leftists of that association a virtue-signaling rebuke to President Trump. If you had taken off your hijab and converted to Christianity or became an atheist, would you have been chosen as a 2017 White House Correspondents’ Association Scholar? Not in a million years.

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50 years later, 3 soldiers reenact, remember their iconic Six-Day war photo

The David Rubinger photograph of three paratroopers standing in silent awe in front of the recaptured Western Wall after the battle for Jerusalem in 1967 has become the defining image of one of the most significant moments in Israel’s history.

With the 50th anniversary of the Six Day War approaching, Zion Karasenti, Haim Oshri, and Dr. Itizik Yifat returned to the Old City this week to remember the moment.

Karasenti, Oshri, and Yifat described to Channel 2 News how they, as 20-something reserve duty soldiers, inadvertently became the symbol of a nation fulfilling a 2,000 year dream.

“There were snipers everywhere, especially from overhead. They could have thrown a grenade on us and finished us,” Karasenti recalled of the battle for the Jerusalem holy site.

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Why Is Female Genital Mutilation Still Happening in the U.S.?

Let’s be clear: FGM (female genital mutilation) is illegal in the United States. That fact did not stop Drs. Humana Nagarwala, Fakhruddin Attar, and his wife Farida Attar, from allegedly performing these criminal and human rights atrocities against two vulnerable 7-year-old girls in the Detroit metro area. The physicians and Attar’s wife have all been arrested. According to Fox 2 News in Detroit the three have been charged with female genital mutilation and conspiracy. The doctors are also charged with making false statements to investigators and trying to obstruct the investigation.

For years, many Muslims have insisted that the practice of FGM has nothing to do with Islam, that it is, originally, an African and pagan custom. This may be true. However, many Muslims believe it is religiously required.

Boldly, cleverly, the Detroit-area physicians are arguing that FGM is a “religious practice” and that to interfere with it is tantamount to religious discrimination. There is some proof that Mohammed allowed a female “exciser” to perform this mutilation — but he advised her not to “overdo it.”

In the Islamic world, FGM is practiced most widely in the in the Arab Muslim Middle East, both in the Gulf and in African states such as Egypt, Somalia, and Sudan; but it has increasingly spread to Muslim communities in Central Asia (parts of Iraqi Kurdistan and Iran) and to the Far East (Malaysia and Indonesia).

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Empowering Women

Marva Seaton Blog

7 REASONS NOT TO RETURN AN ABUSIVE RELATIONSHIP

  1. Remember that it was the abusive behavior of your partner which caused you to leave in the first place. You were not happy in the relationship.
  2. He will continue to abuse you even if he promises you that he will never hit you again.
  3. Abusers seldom stop their abusive behavior unless they get some form of counseling or therapy so don’t go back and expect him to change simply because he says he has changed. As soon as he gets comfortable with you being back he will start abusing you again.
  4. Abusers like to instill fear in their victims so he will try to make you so fearful of him that you are less likely to leave him.
  5. He may become more possessive and controlling and try to make you more isolated from your family and friends. He might start keeping tabs…

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