Some Wild Ride

A long time ago, a young woman from New York was driving through a remote part of Texas when her car broke down. She was sitting, out of sorts, when a Native American on horseback came along and offered her a ride to a nearby town.
 
Thankful, she climbed up behind him on the horse and they rode off. 
 
indian
The ride was uneventful, except that every few minutes the Indian would shout out a wild “Ye-e-e-e-e-ha-a-a-” so loud that it echoed off the surrounding hills. When they arrived in town, he let her off at the local service station, she expressed her thanks, and he yelled a final “Ye-e-e-e-e-ha-a-a!” and rode off. 
indian
 
“Why was that Indian so excited?” asked the service station attendant. “I don’t know. I just rode behind him on the horse with my arms around his waist and holding onto the saddle horn so that I wouldn’t fall off,” the woman answered. 
“Lady,” the attendant said in a pained expression, “Indians don’t use saddles.”

The Life and Death Difference

Beyond the Cusp

The recent escalation of Arab Palestinian violence and homicidal rage which had claimed too numerous Israeli victims’ and Palestinian attackers’ lives, caused untold misery, left scores injured and disrupted all activity in Jerusalem and beyond has had some telling differences in how they have been covered by the respective media outlets. The Arab Palestinian coverage had emphasized the glorious carnage which should fill every Arab Palestinian great pride and desires to emulate these shahids and their great courage committing these acts of vengeance and for the protection of the Arab Palestinian cause and the area of the al-Aqsa Mosque which they are protecting from being “defiled by the Jews and their filthy feet.” The Israeli coverage has decried the carnage and mourned the deaths of every victim including the Arab Palestinians who needfully were killed as they would not cease their homicidal rage even after being shot and wounded and…

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Papal economics: for richer or for poorer?

The Pope’s own country of origin, Argentina, is a case in point: at the beginning of the twentieth century it was, I think, the seventh richest country in the world. However it has, through its insane Peronist socialism, turned itself into a disaster case. By the time Francis became a cardinal, more than half the country was rated ‘poor’, including 70 percent of children.

This is bound to have an effect on a leader, and The Pope, it is fair to say, doesn’t like business.’

Human rights are not only violated by terrorism, repression or assassination but also by unfair economic structures that creates (sic) huge inequalities.”

These days there is a lot of poverty in the world, and that is a scandal when we have so many riches and resources to give to everyone. We all have to think about how we can become a little poorer.’

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The Politics of Lies

A flight from Kuala Lumpur to Istanbul will usually take around 11 hours. All the same, politically, Turkey and Malaysia are not so distant. The Turkish-Malaysian political parallels are crucial in understanding political Islam.

Back in 2013, President (then Prime Minister) Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s chief advisor, Yigit Bulut, said that he would be “willing to die for Erdogan.” He added: “There are millions like me.” The statement was not shocking news in a country where Erdogan fans had the habit of walking around in shrouds — in expression of their willingness to die for the supreme leader.

Two years later, the same leader-fetish has emerged in Malaysia. Rizuan Abd Hamid, a local leader in Kuala Lumpur of Malaysia’s ruling party, UMNO (United Malays National Organization), said that he was willing to fight for Prime Minister Najib Razak “until his last breath.”

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The Islamization Of Thailand…..Roger

Chainsoff's Blog

Thai Muslim women gather for a prayer outside a mosque in the southern province of Pattani during the month of Ramadan late August 24, 2010. The troubled rubber-rich provinces of Pattani, Yala and Narathiwat were part of a Muslim sultanate annexed a century ago by predominantly Buddhist Thailand. Picture taken August 24, 2010. REUTERS/Surapan Boonthanom (THAILAND - Tags: RELIGION SOCIETY) Thai Muslim women gather for a prayer outside a mosque in the southern province of Pattani during the month of Ramadan late August 24, 2010. The troubled rubber-rich provinces of Pattani, Yala and Narathiwat were part of a Muslim sultanate annexed a century ago by predominantly Buddhist Thailand. Picture taken August 24, 2010. REUTERS/Surapan Boonthanom (THAILAND – Tags: RELIGION SOCIETY)

Murray Hunter
The perceived relative homogeneity of Thai culture and society is being challenged on multiple fronts today. So much has been said about the socio-economic division within Thai society, epitomized by the ‘red’ verses ‘yellow’ shirt movements, and political outcomes over the last decade and a half.

However very little is said, publicly anyway, about the growing influence upon Thai society, that Thailand’s Muslim population is now projecting at many levels.
The current Muslim population of Thailand is between 5-6%, depending upon which set of statistics you consult. This…

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